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More on SoundExchange/NPR webcast licensing deal: more reporting requirements

As we reported on March 17, SoundExchange and National Public Radio (NPR) reached an agreement for webcast music licensing in the 2016-2020 royalty period. NPR agreed to increase the number of stations providing detailed census reporting of the music they play in webcasts. We spoke to Rusty Hodge of SomaFM about whether those reports are difficult to produce. Continue Reading

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NPR/CPB licensing agreement with SoundExchange: +17% for 2016-2020

RAIN News has learned that NPR and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting have agreed to a 17% music licensing rate increase for the 2016-2020 royalty period. The new rate anchors an agreement between the nonprofit public media outlets and SoundExchange, the royalty collection and distribution entity representing artists and record labels to webcasters. Continue Reading

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SoundExchange inks webcasting royalty deal with public broadcasting

SoundExchange has reached an agreement with NPR and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting that sets royalty rates for webcasting for the next five years. In doing this, both parties shortcut the Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) rate-setting process which started last year, and will conclude in December when the CRB announces new webcaster music licensing rates for 2016-2020. Continue Reading

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SoundExchange to audit Live365, iHeartMedia, CBS Radio in standard compliance sweep

When a reader and pureplay station operator sent us a government notice of SoundExchange’s intent to audit the streaming royalty payments made by Live365, iHeartMedia, and CBS Radio for 2011, 2012, and 2013, we turned to broadcast law attorney David Oxenford (author of the deeply informative Broadcast Law Blog) to find out how significant the action is. Continue Reading

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Sony boss calls for better songwriter/publisher royalties from streaming

Martin Bandier, chairman and CEO of Sony/ATV, has added his voice to the criticism of rates paid to music publishers for streaming. “We at Sony/ATV want these digital music services to be successful because they are a great way for music fans to listen to music and have the potential to generate significant new revenues for everyone,” he said. “However, this success should not come at the expense of songwriters whose songs are essential for these services to exist and thrive.” Continue Reading