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Spotify says it overpaid publishers in 2018 and wants to recoup funds

Spotify’s interactions with publishers and songwriters have gotten even more complicated, with the streaming service claiming that it overpaid on mechanical royalties in 2018. The Copyright Royalty Board issued its mechanical royalty payment rates in December 2018 after the music platform had already paid out almost a full year under a different rate scheme. Continue Reading

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Quartet of streaming companies file intent to appeal CRB mechanical royalties

The Copyright Royalty Board rates set for 2018 through 2022 are soon to face a legal challenge. A group of streaming and technology platforms — including Spotify, Google, Pandora, and Amazon — filed notices that they intend to appeal the mechanical statutory licensing rates for that period. Continue Reading

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David Oxenford: Court of Appeals Upholds Copyright Royalty Board’s 2015 Webcasting Royalty Rate Decision

by David Oxenford

Years after the decision, SoundExchange is still pushing for an appeal of the Copyright Royalty Board’s determination of webcasting rates for the 2016-2020 period. Legal expert David Oxenford shares some background on how appeals courts review these cases and breaks down the latest ruling. Continue Reading

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Copyright Royalty Board announces small cost of living adjustments for 2018 rates

The Copyright Royalty Board has issued its cost of living adjustments for royalty rates in 2018. The new rate for ad-supported, non-subscription music streaming services in 2018 is $0.0018. Paid subscription services will pay $0.0023 per performance. The previous rates were $0.0017 for ad-supported and $0.0022 for subscription. Continue Reading

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NMPA gets 4,000 to sign songwriter petition to CRB

The National Music Publishers Association is circulating a petition among songwriters to gather support for its case with the Copyright Royalty Board. The CRB will decide on a royalty rate for interactive music streams over the 2018-2022 period over the course of this year, hearing proposals from all sides of the music industry. Continue Reading

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Live365 set to return: Big news for small webcasters

Live365, the internet radio host which catastrophically unplugged its service in January, has resurfaced and is planning to re-open. The re-emergence of a mainstay resource for internet radio stations will come as a shock of good news to small webcasters which have struggled to survive since January, or which have not survived. But the news is full of yet-unanswered questions. Continue Reading

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In the new era of small webcasting, StreamLicensing builds tech to survive

Webcaster host StreamLicensing runs a business model that pays label royalties on behalf of its member stations, funding the business with advertising target to combined audiences. But when that royalty cost dramatically escalated for U.S. webcasting in January, owner Marvin Glass sold to Stardome Media Group and warned the new owners that success would be an uphill climb. We spoke with a Stardome exec about the way forward. Continue Reading

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CRB ruling goes to Federal Register; appeal window opens for disputing webcast rates

The Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) ruling of new webcast royalty rates to labels was published in the Federal Register yesterday, per process schedule. Now begins a one-month appeal window, during which participants may file litigation which contests the ruling. Who is permitted to appeal, and who is not? Click for details. Continue Reading

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Radionomy blocks U.S. listening on TuneIn because of CRB rates

RAIN News has learned that Radionomy has pulled its stations from TuneIn’s U.S. listening audience, over the cost of music licensing under the new Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) royalty rates. Radionomy told RAIN News that the company asked TuneIn to geo-block the U.S. from Radionomy streams. It is the latest disruption in the webcast industry coming from CRB rates implemented on January 1. Continue Reading