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IFPI 2016 report sees global streaming revenue up 60.4%

The IFPI published its annual global music report reflecting on the industry’s 2016 performance. Global revenue increased 5.9% to $15.7 billion. Digital revenue rose 17.8% to $7.8 billion, enough that it now has a 50% share of the global music industry’s total. “If the digital market continues to grow, so too will the overall level of remuneration to artists, as will the levels of overall investment required to create new music whilst helping to drive digital innovation,” IFPI CEO Frances Moore said. Continue Reading

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Music consumption explodes worldwide, powered by streaming (IFPI)

The IFPI has released its 2016 global report, which points to streaming as the key reason behind music’s first year of significant total revenue growth since 1995. Global revenue rose 3.2% last year to $15 billion. Digital outperformed physical revenue for the first time, a result that echoes the U.S. trend highlighted by the RIAA’s annual report. Within that strong performance, streaming emerged as a powerhouse, accounting for 43% of the year’s digital revenue. Continue Reading

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Streaming accounts for 72% of Denmark’s music market

IFPI Denmark released data on the first half of 2015 for the country’s music industry, which showed a strong performance by streaming. Revenue from streaming platforms rose by 14% in H1 2015 compared with H1 2014. Recorded music overall rose just 0.4% since the same period last year, which physical sales dropping 35% and downloads falling 13% from the year-ago period. Continue Reading

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IFPI CEO explores the financial breakdown of streaming revenue

The IFPI has thrown its hat into the ring to discuss streaming royalties paid to artists. The group’s CEO Frances Moore penned a blog post about this delicate subject based on IFPI’s own research into the music industry’s financial situation. “The issue is not that artists are getting lower royalty payments from digital services – they are not – but that the overall recorded music market has shrunk, which means smaller revenues for all involved,” she wrote. Continue Reading