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NMPA gets 4,000 to sign songwriter petition to CRB

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The National Music Publishers Association is circulating a petition among songwriters to gather support for its case with the Copyright Royalty Board. The CRB will decide on a royalty rate for interactive music streams over the 2018-2022 period over the course of this year, hearing proposals from all sides of the music industry.

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Live365 set to return: Big news for small webcasters

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Live365, the internet radio host which catastrophically unplugged its service in January, has resurfaced and is planning to re-open. The re-emergence of a mainstay resource for internet radio stations will come as a shock of good news to small webcasters which have struggled to survive since January, or which have not survived. But the news is full of yet-unanswered questions.

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In the new era of small webcasting, StreamLicensing builds tech to survive

Webcaster host StreamLicensing runs a business model that pays label royalties on behalf of its member stations, funding the business with advertising target to combined audiences. But when that royalty cost dramatically escalated for U.S. webcasting in January, owner Marvin Glass sold to Stardome Media Group and warned the new owners that success would be an uphill climb. We spoke with a Stardome exec about the way forward.

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Radionomy blocks U.S. listening on TuneIn because of CRB rates

RAIN News has learned that Radionomy has pulled its stations from TuneIn's U.S. listening audience, over the cost of music licensing under the new Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) royalty rates. Radionomy told RAIN News that the company asked TuneIn to geo-block the U.S. from Radionomy streams. It is the latest disruption in the webcast industry coming from CRB rates implemented on January 1.

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Copyright Royalty Board to NAB: Well done, but no dice

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One of the most interesting aspects of the full determination just released by the Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) is the detailed argument put forward by the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) that radio simulcasts should pay a lower music royalty rate than pureplay webcasting (e.g. Pandora). The copyright judges praised the NAB witness presentations, but ultimately rejected the attempt.

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CRB full decision released; small webcasters not mentioned

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The Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) published its full determination, as expected following the very brief announcement of new webcast royalty rates on December 16. To whatever extent small webcasters cast a hopeful wish that the complete royalty rate decision would offer some sign of a special provision for low-revenue Internet radio, that hope is dashed.

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Live365 announces shut-down at the end of January

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Live365 has informed at least some of its webcasters that it will be shutting down at the end of the month. The Internet radio hosting platform laid off the bulk of its staff and left its offices at the end of December, shortly after the Copyright Royalty Board decision about new rates, and the expiration of a law protecting small webcasters, sent shockwaves through the webcasting community.

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Live365 suffers a collision of misfortunes, lays off most employees and vacates office

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Live365, one of the most venerable brands in this industry, is affected by shifting regulations that change the cost of music on January. In addition, the company's investors have pulled support from the company, forcing an immediate financial crisis. RAIN News has learned that as a result, nearly the entire staff was laid off this week.

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CRB Developments: Revised Rates and Terms, Issues about Performance Complement and Small Webcasters

Unsettled issues are flowing into the industry mindspace following the Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) ruling of new webcast royalty rates to labels on December 16. Broadcast law attorney David Oxenford untangles what the issues mean to broadcasters and small webcasters.

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